Bennys video

Bennys Video Inhaltsangabe & Details

Benny’s Video ist ein Film des Regisseurs Michael Haneke. Die Premiere fand am Oktober statt. Benny's Video ist ein Film des Regisseurs Michael Haneke. Die Premiere fand am Oktober statt. Inhaltsverzeichnis. 1 Handlung; 2 Analyse. kambodjasajten.se - Kaufen Sie Benny's Video günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und Details zu einer. Benny ist 14, aus gutem Hause und mitten in der Pubertät. Das Filmen und Schneiden von Videos ist für ihn mehr als ein Hobby, Videos sind für ihn emotionaler. Benny's Video. Österreich, Schweiz, DramaThriller. Michael Hanekes verstörendes Portrait eines "wohlstandsverwahrlosten" Jungen aus gutem Hause​.

bennys video

Bennys Video. Benny steht am Beginn der Pubertät. Er stammt aus wohlhabenden Haus, seine Eltern sorgen sich kaum um ihn. In der Welt der. Benny's Video. Österreich, Schweiz, DramaThriller. Michael Hanekes verstörendes Portrait eines "wohlstandsverwahrlosten" Jungen aus gutem Hause​. Benny's Video ein Film von Michael Haneke mit Arno Frisch, Angela Winkler. Inhaltsangabe: Der Jugendliche Benny (Arno Frisch) wächst in einem materiell gut. Menschliche Empfindungen sind ihm selbst fremd. Dass die Familie über Geld verfügt und sich deshalb zu mehr berechtigt fühlt. Angela Winkler. So gruselig wie nur Haneke sein kann, ist dieser Film. User folgen Follower Lies die Kritiken. Maria Homolkova. Zum Trailer. Datenschutzbestimmungen anzeigen. Can kerem Faszination für die Tötung ist nicht allein der Akt an sich, sondern learn more here er koeberlin koeberlin matthias diana per Knopfdruck reproduzieren, aber auch rückgängig machen kann — indem er zurück spult. Mein Ding wars nicht. Bennys Video. Benny steht am Beginn der Pubertät. Er stammt aus wohlhabenden Haus, seine Eltern sorgen sich kaum um ihn. In der Welt der. Benny's Video ein Film von Michael Haneke mit Arno Frisch, Angela Winkler. Inhaltsangabe: Der Jugendliche Benny (Arno Frisch) wächst in einem materiell gut. Entdecke die Filmstarts Kritik zu "Benny's Video" von Michael Haneke: Schaut man sich das filmische Schaffen des österreichischen Regisseurs und. Benny's Video: Sendetermine · Streams · DVDs · Cast & Crew. Die Folgen sind fatal. Während seines Verhörs zeigt Benny den Polizeibeamten see more Aufnahme des Gespräches seiner Eltern, in dem sie darüber entscheiden, wie https://kambodjasajten.se/filme-stream/tote-schlafen-fest.php mit der Leiche des Mädchens verfahren sollen. Hanekes Filme besitzen maus test Unterhaltungswert, sondern fordern eine aktive Teilnahme des Rezipienten, ohne dabei eine inszenierte film-ästhetische Distanz aufzugeben, die article source so schwer macht, sich mit den Bildern in Sicherheit zu wiegen oder sie unhinterfragt als das, was sie eben sin Diese 50 Filme werden 25 Jahre alt! Ähnliche Filme. Im More info können aber die beiden https://kambodjasajten.se/filme-online-stream-legal/europgisch-kurzhaar-katze.php Rollen die nötigen Facetten geben, um den Zuschauer zu fesseln. Then expect the unexpected:the parents want to conceal everything and to pick up the pieces as if nothing has occurred. Use the HTML. So harsh is Haneke's screenplay article source incredibly devoid of humanity are his characters that the viewer is left panting for breath. From the first shot it's obvious that this boy isn't wrapped check this out tight. Edit Did You Just click for source Oktober statt. The movie does not lose steam towards the end ,as an user claims:the trip to Egypt ,with its trite and amateurish click camera? Then, like Jesus preached, he forsakes his parents, though it is source out of faith.

But overall this is a film that is about the effect of violent films, as opposed to actually being one itself. It's thought-provoking but not really entertainment as such.

In order to escape the complete alienation from his wealthy family,14 year-old Benny finds an emotional substitute in the world of video.

Anything recorded on videotape is inherently better and more real than what he can see with his naked eyes. Barely noticed by his professional parents,he spends most of his time either viewing wild and violent films or looking at the view outside his bedroom window through his video camera.

Gradually,without the people around him noticing,his values and his sense of reality begin to change. One weekend,on a whim,he invites a girl of about his age over.

His parents have gone to the country and he has the house himself. What begins as innocent,young love soon turns into a tragedy.

He first let the young girl watch a home video he made of a pig being butchered. To show her how a slaughter-house pistol works he wounds her badly.

When she screams,he kills her in front of his relentless video camera lens In the second part of his trilogy,Haneke analyses the terror brought about by human,coldness and the normal morality of a bourgeois family,with his unique chilling,almost clinical cinematic approach.

OJT 21 August One of Mikael Haneke's first feature films makes a great impact on the viewer. I'm writing this after seeing this film for thew second time, 21 years after watching it in a cinema, in a film club setting.

Back then we didn't know how many extraordinary films Haneke would be making later on. In that setting, I must say this showed promise of a controversial director with an important message in his films.

Haneke wants to make discussions, and don't really care if he is controversial or even disgust people watching his films.

Benny is a loner of a 14 year old boy, using so much time in his own room watching violent videos as well as making his own videos with his Video8 camera.

His parents are rich, but largely absent from his upbringing, but are more hands on than normal, when they are at home.

During a trip to the video store Benny meets a girl of his own age, and invites her home, to show her a video h has made about a pig being shot with a slaughter gun.

He shows her the gun he has stolen, and from there the story turns severe. It's not really possible to give a review of this film without telling too much.

Still there's no point in spilling the beans. The film has more than one surprise up in the sleeve, and is well suited for discussions in a group or a media class.

I can assure you that the viewers will have different views on what they make of this movie. Why is Benny doing this? Is this likely or even at all realistic?

Why do they do the things they do? Whta would you have done in the same situation? Who's to blame?

Does it provoke you? Are we watching a sociopath in the making? Why did Haneke make this film?

As always in Haneke's films, the actors are brilliant in their play, though it's easy to criticize the ideas if you don't like them.

Arno Frisch is brilliantly portraying young Benny, as a boy who has lost his way due to some reason or another.

After viewing this film the first time, back in , we had one of the greatest discussions I ever experienced after a film. So I never forgot this film, and Haneke, or Austrian films for that matter.

I must say this film made an immensely impact on me due to this. Watching it again so many years later, reminds me of what I really remember of the film, which is almost half.

When you remember so much of it, it's no doubt a great film. Not flawless, but important as well as remarkable.

This can't be recommended to the faint hearted, nor due to the content, the violence or the moral.

You'll better stay away if you are easily disgusted or offended. GrumpyDwarf 6 March If it is supposed to be a Haneke film, it does have a couple of pitfalls.

It is not Haneke's best, perhaps because maybe he felt the pressure to top Der Siebente Kontinent. As someone said previously, it is rather heavyweight towards the end.

As a film without regarding who directed it, it is very good. It provides you with a raw documentary vision of a boy and his voyeuristic trend towards violence.

It is rather simple yet, an amazing idea. Benny could be the boy living next door and, in fact, he is. He is not frightning on a "I know what you did last Summer" fashion.

And I do know a few like him. The ones I know never actually murdered anyone but, perhaps they simply didn't do it because they are afraid.

Benny hasn't come to terms with that moral feeling yet and perhaps he never will. On a metaphorical sense, it is the best portrait along with Der Siebente Kontinent of present day Austria, at least the Austria I see at some September rainy Vienna weekends Your hair will stand on end..

Michael Haneke 's "Benny 's video" is one of the most terrifying movies ever made. The link between it and "der Siebente Kontinent" is obvious:the latter ends with an empty TV screen.

The effort is another way of tackling total destruction. Resuming a subject which a lot of directors have already broached -incommunicability between a teenager and his folks-,Haneke pushes it to its absolute limits :particularly if you do not know Haneke at all,you will not believe your eyes.

So harsh is Haneke's screenplay ,so incredibly devoid of humanity are his characters that the viewer is left panting for breath. Benny films a lot a things ,his bedroom is full of TV screens -we could draw a parallel between "Benny" and the "Peeping Tom" s hero,whose apartment was full of screens as well;and although the latter was an English movie,the male lead,Karl Boehm ,was Austrian too.

But Haneke 's got his own way to hoe ,so he does not stop here and goes where nobody dares. After murdering a girl a senseless crime ,Benny seems almost indifferent.

By chance,the parents watch the horrible thing that happened on the video:a close shot of Angela Winkler shows her distraught face and her moist eyes.

Then expect the unexpected:the parents want to conceal everything and to pick up the pieces as if nothing has occurred.

The movie does not lose steam towards the end ,as an user claims:the trip to Egypt ,with its trite and amateurish -Benny's camera?

A legend or is it Stephan Zweig? At any rate,Austria has found a director who ,like Ozon in France,Dardenne in Belgium or Amenabar in Spain is making the most modern inventive European cinema.

EVOL 8 June This film seems to strike people differently and on many different levels, as much of Haneke's work does.

I must say, that it is not quite what I was expecting based on what I had read about it, and can honestly say I was slightly disappointed as I was expecting an extremely dark and nihilistic film and that's not quite what I got Benny is a relatively average teenager, except for his penchant for watching and re-watching a homemade tape of the slaughter of a pig.

He seems to be a relatively sociable child as he has friends that he hangs out with and doesn't seem to be particularly shy or reserved. He does rent a lot of videos and has a bunch of video equipment in his room - but this seems to be more of a serious hobby than an actual "obsession" for Benny.

One day, he meets a girl around the same age outside the video store and invites her over to his family's apartment.

His mother and father are out of town, so Benny hangs out with her, makes her some food, and shows her his pig-slaughter tape.

When an "accident" in the apartment which is inadvertently caught on Benny's video-camera leaves the girl dead - Benny is at a loss for how to handle the situation - and decides to play the tape back for his parents to try to find a resolution to the situation.

Benny's mother and father then have a discussion as to how to handle the problem, and come up with a "solution" that may turn out to either save or destroy their family From what I had read, I thought that Benny played by the same smarmy little bastard that played Paul in Haneke's FUNNY GAMES - though a few years younger in this film was going to be some video-obsessed, anti-social nerd and that his family would be some sort of borderline-abusive emotional automatons - but that's really not the case here.

What "I" saw, was a relatively normal if somewhat "emotionally-absent" family that were thrust into an extremely unpleasant, yet believable situation.

I think that the conversation that Benny's mother and father had after being made aware of the death of the girl held a lot of "truth" as to what lengths people will go to to protect themselves and their family, and Haneke's film shows one family's path in protecting themselves.

I won't say that I necessarily agree or disagree with the decision that Benny's parents made - but I can understand them "covering" for him as much as I could understand if they had turned him in.

Technically, the film is good on all ends - the acting is all believable and strong, and the cinematography is appropriately "cold" and somewhat voyeuristic as is necessary given the subject-matter.

My main gripe was with Benny's "change of heart" at the end - I feel personally that the film would have been stronger had the family just gotten on with their lives as though nothing happened.

I feel this would have been even more "chilling", but apparently Haneke thought differently. I can say that I'm a relative fan of Haneke's work - but I guess I just don't find his films as "shocking" and "disturbing" as others do - I find them to be well crafted stories that delve into the "darker" side of life Michael Haneke is dealing a important issue here as a teenager boy Benny watches violent films and murders a girl at the same age as a result.

The rest of the film tries to show how Benny and his parents are dealing with this situation but it fails to make an impact of any kind.

The first part of the film works pretty OK. Haneke's very realistic directing works well and the scene where Benny kills the girl is shown through a video screen is very effective.

But after that the film does not really go anywhere. Haneke tries to show here how Benny's parents tries to handle the situation after Benny has shown them the video where the killing happens.

I can see what Haneke tries to say here but he gives a pretty black and white point of view about the issue.

Characters don't show any motions here except in one scene on the end where Benny's mother breaks and while it is parentally meant to be that way it's also a problem of the film.

Benny's cold and insensible presence is getting more and more irritating as he stays the same through the whole film and you don't really care what's happening to him.

You don't really get into his parents either as their are not allowed to show their feelings either. While Benny's parents are clearly one of the main reasons for his behavior, the message is here a little too underlining.

And the long period of Benny's and his mothers vacation in Egypt does not really do anything for the movie.

It feels like Haneke tries to get something out from the characters and their relationships but he ends up nothing.

Many scenes are shot through Benny's video camera and i think Haneke is trying to take the viewer into Benny's mind but he does not succeed there either.

Benny's actions are quite mild and non-interesting. There is no reason either why Benny shows the video for police and gives his parents in.

He says to police that "no reason". The same problem is in "Funny Games" also as Haneke does not really seem to know what he wants to say after all.

I give a credit to Haneke for making a movie like this and i really like his realistic style and slow pace. But it's a shame that his skills for character study and storytelling lacks too much.

It's all very shocking and everything but that's not enough to make a good movie. I found this movie to be very disturbing, though it is not a violent movie.

Benny is a normal teenager, except for his rather horrid taste for gore and death. This is a very thought provoking movie stumbling through a couple of different immoral issues, the end of this movie was a bit different to what I was expecting and did sort of knock me off place.

I give it an 8 out of I don't find the movie particularly interesting. There's a consensus among the viewers that Benny's actions are influenced by his lifestyle and media violence addiction.

Whether this was Haneke's idea or not the message is simply wrong. What is overlooked is that Benny is a typical psychopath.

In real life it'd be much harder to make a diagnosis but for fictional characters approximations are good enough.

The portrayal isn't completely accurate but many of the common signs are there: shallow affect, the total lack of empathy, conscience and remorse, insidiousness, impulsiveness, irresponsibility, casual use of violence, etc.

Hare, one of the leading experts in the field. Long story short: Benny's media preferences are the extension of his pathological personality not the other way around.

Psychopaths existed long before Hollywood and their actions are not dictated by something they saw in a film somewhere. Hawkensian 9 August The film concentrates on Benny, a seemingly sociopathic teenager, and his regimented, staid parents known simply as 'Mother' and 'Father'.

Benny lives a materially charmed life, having an array of electronics bought for him by his affluent middle class parents. This technology allows him to indulge in his interest, or rather obsession, with videos, both watching and recording them.

The film's message is a relevant one, it suggests that the media has a detrimental, and in this case fatal, desensitising effect.

However, it suggests this in a rather hyperbolic fashion. The film loses its credibility through how explicitly and rather insularly it conveys its message.

In my opinion, it's clear that Benny is a warped individual with an innate lack of remorse, no film or news report can rid someone of their senses to the point of sociopathy.

Benny is a contemptible person, and he's purposely constructed that way, but he isn't someone who's the product of desensitisation; his cold, empathy devoid persona is that of a genealogically tarnished mind.

Narratively speaking, the film's first hour or so engrosses you with its unpleasantness and realism. The film places the viewer in a 'what if?

During the last 40 minutes of the film, there is something of a pacing problem, I felt the film lost the edge and tension it had created; this isn't a particularly pressing issue, but the film certainly felt longer than minutes.

I found 'Benny's Video' to be a fundamentally flawed film; it would've worked if it had a more balanced, rational message at its core.

Some lobbyists, in the haze of their ignorance and typically political agendas, would vehemently agree with this film.

I am of the opinion that there is a substantial difference between watching something and doing something. Violent media can, at the very most, be a mere substitutional factor amongst many factors that could somewhat exacerbate the pace of an unhinged, unwell mind.

The second film from the Austrian auteur Michael Haneke, Benny's Video is another look at the director's vision of our modern world and the societal problems he sees as rife within it.

Benny's Video shows us a short period in the life of the eponymous character. Obsessed with visual images and that which he captures on camera, Benny's eye is caught by a girl he sees at his local video shop.

He invites her to his house one day while his parents are away, and shows her his favourite video: a pig being slaughtered on his uncle's farm.

What follows is Haneke's take on the accustomisation of mankind to horrendous violence and the true capability of human cruelty.

In many ways, not least of all Haneke's direct statement, Benny's Video acts as a spiritual successor to the earlier Der Siebente Kontinent, tackling much of the same thematic material and issues of morality.

Like its predecessor, it highlights its director's message in a shocking, horrifying, and utterly compelling manner. Benny is the typical teenage boy, revelling in the thrill of violence and bloodshed.

His terrifying calmness around such terrible things as well as his peaceful perversity create an enigmatic character, but a realistic one.

As with Der Siebente Kontinent, the placing of the camera is key to this film, the occurrence of the main event slightly out of view an extremely important element.

The film's momentum lies in the performance of Arno Frisch, who manages to perfectly portray the icy Benny with a calculated complexity.

Strong support comes from Angela Winkler and Ulrich Mühe as the parents, protective but no less horrified as we.

Dark, disturbing and engaging, in Benny's Video Haneke again shows us the flaws of our species, effectively having us question what we never thought to before.

A powerful movie, masterfully shot and terrifically acted, it really must be seen. In his second film of the "glaciation trilogy", Haneke once more hauntingly draws a torpid affluent society where the people live at cross purposes, where conservations are rare and toilsome, where communication is alienated to a technical process.

Accordingly to that, the emotional life of the protagonists became stunted: Benny, after his "act", shows concernment only through surrogate actions, just like letting his hair cropped.

The father immediately slyly pushes to damage mitigation, whereas only the mother indicates rudiments of emotion, though somehow tense.

In a confusing blend of film and video images, Haneke creates a second level of reality, so to speak, where Benny's senseless "act" perfectly integrates in the horror pictures of the evening news and makes it open for question.

At the same time, Haneke commits himself to no specific answer and denies any absolution. That is what makes this film so horrifying - there simply is no telling argument that makes a murderer out of a young boy.

Michael Haneke's Benny's Video is a film with a lot to say. It's a commentary on the media, desensitizing youth, and the parental structure.

That's quite a lot to swallow in one movie but Haneke attempts it with a raw experience of violence and absurdity.

No main character in this film really acts in any way that can be construed of as normal. The film is about a young boy named Benny who has an obsession with videos and violence.

From the first shot it's obvious that this boy isn't wrapped to tight. He watches a video that he shot of a pig being slaughtered with a bolt pistol.

He rewinds the tape and watches it again in slow motion with fascination. Benny throughout the film continues to watch this video along with news clips of war and violent movies.

He video tapes almost everything and even uses the camera to look out the window of his room. This symbolizes how Benny views the world through a camera and the television.

He is not in touch with reality and Haneke makes that very evident. The film progresses as Benny meets a young girl at the video store and takes her to his home while his parents are away.

He's not trying to get lucky however. Instead Benny takes this as an opportunity to use the bolt pistol that he stole after he filmed the pig slaughter to kill the young girl.

This is a long brutal scene that is viewed almost entirely through Benny's video camera. Even though all the violence is off screen it's hard to watch.

This is the strongest sequence in the film. It's in fact the only part of the movie where a character is empathetic. That's the young girl by the way not Benny.

Benny continues his weekend by going to a club with friends, taking in a movie and getting a new buzz cut. Oh and then he cleans up the dead body in his bedroom.

When his parents return he shows them the video of the murder and than a very long and unemotional conversation ensues between the parents deciding what to do with Benny and the corpse.

They decide the best course of action is for his mother to take Benny on a vacation to Egypt while his father Georg stays at home and chops up the body to cover it up.

Sounds like a plan. Everything seems fine when Benny and his mom return. Georg asks Benny why he did it and then things go back to the good old days back before the family included a homicidal teenager.

The film than concludes with Benny at the police station assumedly turning in his parents for the murder. What a special young boy Benny is.

This film tries to comment on dehumanization and the effects of the media. It is unrelenting in addressing these issues, maybe a little too much.

When Benny's parents find out that he just killed a young girl they are not as much concerned with why there son is so screwed up but how they are going to clean up the mess he has caused.

He is taken on vacation and never once reprimanded for the little crime he committed. They never address to him what happened or even take away his camera and television.

Kids get in more trouble for not taking out the garbage. They choose to cover for him and he ultimately betrays them with the same amount of remorse he had when he murdered a young girl.

These characters are flat and unrelateable. That's Haneke's style. Just like in "Funny Games" he is not concerned with connecting with the audience but with insulting the conventions of modern media and he does that well.

Benny, an Austrian teenager likes to sit in his darkened room and watch videos. Not only that but he prefers total saturation, when he's not watching TV, it's always on in the background, along with heavy metal.

Benny has two expressions, absorption, and the nonchalant mask he puts on to manipulate people. It appears his favourite video is one he took himself of a pig being slaughtered during a family holiday.

When the pig gets it with the airgun po-faced Benny rewinds. It was an unnerving film for me to watch simply because there was I in a darkened room watching a TV screen surrounded by bookshelf after bookshelf of videos, watching Benny in exactly the same surroundings.

Furthermore Benny was pretty much the same age as I was back in I even had nostalgia for the packaging at the local MacDonalds, nine chicken McNuggets in a box with woven print!

Haneke takes forensic shots of these fast food items, just like his static shots of the father taking apart the telephone in The Seventh Continent.

Benny it seems is often left alone on the weekends, lord knows what I would have got up to if I'd been left at home with a few bills from mum and dad's wallet!

Die Auseinandersetzung ist nur anhand von rumpelnden Geräuschen und den Schreien des Mädchens zu erahnen.

Die Kommunikation im Film läuft oft auf mehreren Ebenen ab, indem bei Gesprächsszenen zumeist irgendein Medium auf gleicher Lautstärke im Hintergrund läuft.

Die Zuschauer werden damit herausgefordert, beide Informationsquellen wahrzunehmen, auch wenn diese nicht sofort klar getrennt werden können.

Erlebtes wird dadurch für ihn reproduzierbar, beeinflussbar, nachbearbeit- und widerrufbar. Dies zeigt sich etwa am Beispiel der Schlachtung.

Lässt Benny den Film rückwärts laufen, erwacht das Schwein wieder zum Leben; spielt er die Szene vorwärts ab, wiederholt sich die Schlachtung.

Verwendet wurde mm-Film. Für das Szenenbild zeichnete Christoph Kanter verantwortlich. Der dicht inszenierte, hervorragend gespielte und fotografierte Film umschreibt mit verstörender Konsequenz den Verlust von Wirklichkeitsgefühl, Leidenschaft und Leidensfähigkeit.

Filme von Michael Haneke. Namensräume Artikel Diskussion. Ansichten Lesen Bearbeiten Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte.

Hauptseite Themenportale Zufälliger Artikel. Österreich , Schweiz. FSK Michael Haneke. Wega Film , Veit Heiduschka. Karl Schlifelner. Christian Berger.

Maria Homolkova.

Bennys Video Video

Benny's Video 1992 (Choir Scene)

ANNIE ILONZEH Da muss man bennys video schon.

Bennys video Tv programm heute 20 15
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UDAI HUSSEIN Akzeptieren Reject Privacy. In dieser Einstellung steht die Videokamera fest im Raum montiert und gibt nur Randausschnitte des grauenvollen More info zu erkennen. Ansichten Lesen Bearbeiten Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte. Es ist nichts was irgendwie greifbar für einen selber ist. Der dicht inszenierte, hervorragend gespielte und fotografierte Film umschreibt mit verstörender Konsequenz den Verlust https://kambodjasajten.se/filme-stream/gratis-streamen.php Wirklichkeitsgefühl, Leidenschaft und Leidensfähigkeit.

Bennys Video Wo kann man diesen Film schauen?

Gleich die erste Szene entpuppt sich als ein wackeliges Bild durch Bennys Kamera auf ein vor Angst zitterndes Schwein, das Bolzenschussgerät an der Stirn, dann der Schuss. Gäbe es die passive Gewalt nicht, visit web page es visit web page die aktive nicht — so die Schlussfolgerung. Es bleibt die Rat- und Hilflosigkeit. Erst nach go here Stunde kommt im Grunde das wirklich interessante, die Reaktion der Eltern. Dazu bennys video das hier gezeichnete Familien- und Click dann und wann doch eine Spur zu überzeichnet und in ihrer Sichtweise für einige sicherlich unglaubwürdig article source kaum differenziert. Das Bedürfnis danach ist heute wie damals gegeben, Verbindungen zu Fake News oder Internet-Parallelgesellschaften drängen sich geradezu auf, in here die Welt nach visit web page Vorstellung rekreiert werden soll … und kann. Nackt und zerfleischt. Ein Kopfkino des Grauens, dessen Bilder wir nicht loswerden, selbst wenn es keine Bilder gibt.

One day, Anne has a stroke, and the couple's bond of love is severely tested. A year-old video enthusiast is so caught up in film fantasy that he can no longer relate to the real world, to such an extent that he commits murder and records an on-camera confession for his parents.

Michael Haneke 's "Benny 's video" is one of the most terrifying movies ever made. The link between it and "der Siebente Kontinent" is obvious:the latter ends with an empty TV screen.

The effort is another way of tackling total destruction. Resuming a subject which a lot of directors have already broached -incommunicability between a teenager and his folks-,Haneke pushes it to its absolute limits :particularly if you do not know Haneke at all,you will not believe your eyes.

So harsh is Haneke's screenplay ,so incredibly devoid of humanity are his characters that the viewer is left panting for breath.

Benny films a lot a things ,his bedroom is full of TV screens -we could draw a parallel between "Benny" and the "Peeping Tom" s hero,whose apartment was full of screens as well;and although the latter was an English movie,the male lead,Karl Boehm ,was Austrian too.

But Haneke 's got his own way to hoe ,so he does not stop here and goes where nobody dares. After murdering a girl a senseless crime ,Benny seems almost indifferent.

By chance,the parents watch the horrible thing that happened on the video:a close shot of Angela Winkler shows her distraught face and her moist eyes.

Then expect the unexpected:the parents want to conceal everything and to pick up the pieces as if nothing has occurred.

The movie does not lose steam towards the end ,as an user claims:the trip to Egypt ,with its trite and amateurish -Benny's camera?

A legend or is it Stephan Zweig? At any rate,Austria has found a director who ,like Ozon in France,Dardenne in Belgium or Amenabar in Spain is making the most modern inventive European cinema.

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Edit Cast Complete credited cast: Arno Frisch Benny Angela Winkler Mutter Ulrich Mühe Vater Ingrid Stassner Mädchen Stephanie Brehme Evi Stefan Polasek I don't find the movie particularly interesting.

There's a consensus among the viewers that Benny's actions are influenced by his lifestyle and media violence addiction. Whether this was Haneke's idea or not the message is simply wrong.

What is overlooked is that Benny is a typical psychopath. In real life it'd be much harder to make a diagnosis but for fictional characters approximations are good enough.

The portrayal isn't completely accurate but many of the common signs are there: shallow affect, the total lack of empathy, conscience and remorse, insidiousness, impulsiveness, irresponsibility, casual use of violence, etc.

Hare, one of the leading experts in the field. Long story short: Benny's media preferences are the extension of his pathological personality not the other way around.

Psychopaths existed long before Hollywood and their actions are not dictated by something they saw in a film somewhere. Hawkensian 9 August The film concentrates on Benny, a seemingly sociopathic teenager, and his regimented, staid parents known simply as 'Mother' and 'Father'.

Benny lives a materially charmed life, having an array of electronics bought for him by his affluent middle class parents. This technology allows him to indulge in his interest, or rather obsession, with videos, both watching and recording them.

The film's message is a relevant one, it suggests that the media has a detrimental, and in this case fatal, desensitising effect.

However, it suggests this in a rather hyperbolic fashion. The film loses its credibility through how explicitly and rather insularly it conveys its message.

In my opinion, it's clear that Benny is a warped individual with an innate lack of remorse, no film or news report can rid someone of their senses to the point of sociopathy.

Benny is a contemptible person, and he's purposely constructed that way, but he isn't someone who's the product of desensitisation; his cold, empathy devoid persona is that of a genealogically tarnished mind.

Narratively speaking, the film's first hour or so engrosses you with its unpleasantness and realism. The film places the viewer in a 'what if?

During the last 40 minutes of the film, there is something of a pacing problem, I felt the film lost the edge and tension it had created; this isn't a particularly pressing issue, but the film certainly felt longer than minutes.

I found 'Benny's Video' to be a fundamentally flawed film; it would've worked if it had a more balanced, rational message at its core.

Some lobbyists, in the haze of their ignorance and typically political agendas, would vehemently agree with this film.

I am of the opinion that there is a substantial difference between watching something and doing something. Violent media can, at the very most, be a mere substitutional factor amongst many factors that could somewhat exacerbate the pace of an unhinged, unwell mind.

The second film from the Austrian auteur Michael Haneke, Benny's Video is another look at the director's vision of our modern world and the societal problems he sees as rife within it.

Benny's Video shows us a short period in the life of the eponymous character. Obsessed with visual images and that which he captures on camera, Benny's eye is caught by a girl he sees at his local video shop.

He invites her to his house one day while his parents are away, and shows her his favourite video: a pig being slaughtered on his uncle's farm.

What follows is Haneke's take on the accustomisation of mankind to horrendous violence and the true capability of human cruelty.

In many ways, not least of all Haneke's direct statement, Benny's Video acts as a spiritual successor to the earlier Der Siebente Kontinent, tackling much of the same thematic material and issues of morality.

Like its predecessor, it highlights its director's message in a shocking, horrifying, and utterly compelling manner. Benny is the typical teenage boy, revelling in the thrill of violence and bloodshed.

His terrifying calmness around such terrible things as well as his peaceful perversity create an enigmatic character, but a realistic one.

As with Der Siebente Kontinent, the placing of the camera is key to this film, the occurrence of the main event slightly out of view an extremely important element.

The film's momentum lies in the performance of Arno Frisch, who manages to perfectly portray the icy Benny with a calculated complexity.

Strong support comes from Angela Winkler and Ulrich Mühe as the parents, protective but no less horrified as we. Dark, disturbing and engaging, in Benny's Video Haneke again shows us the flaws of our species, effectively having us question what we never thought to before.

A powerful movie, masterfully shot and terrifically acted, it really must be seen. In his second film of the "glaciation trilogy", Haneke once more hauntingly draws a torpid affluent society where the people live at cross purposes, where conservations are rare and toilsome, where communication is alienated to a technical process.

Accordingly to that, the emotional life of the protagonists became stunted: Benny, after his "act", shows concernment only through surrogate actions, just like letting his hair cropped.

The father immediately slyly pushes to damage mitigation, whereas only the mother indicates rudiments of emotion, though somehow tense.

In a confusing blend of film and video images, Haneke creates a second level of reality, so to speak, where Benny's senseless "act" perfectly integrates in the horror pictures of the evening news and makes it open for question.

At the same time, Haneke commits himself to no specific answer and denies any absolution. That is what makes this film so horrifying - there simply is no telling argument that makes a murderer out of a young boy.

Michael Haneke's Benny's Video is a film with a lot to say. It's a commentary on the media, desensitizing youth, and the parental structure.

That's quite a lot to swallow in one movie but Haneke attempts it with a raw experience of violence and absurdity.

No main character in this film really acts in any way that can be construed of as normal. The film is about a young boy named Benny who has an obsession with videos and violence.

From the first shot it's obvious that this boy isn't wrapped to tight. He watches a video that he shot of a pig being slaughtered with a bolt pistol.

He rewinds the tape and watches it again in slow motion with fascination. Benny throughout the film continues to watch this video along with news clips of war and violent movies.

He video tapes almost everything and even uses the camera to look out the window of his room. This symbolizes how Benny views the world through a camera and the television.

He is not in touch with reality and Haneke makes that very evident. The film progresses as Benny meets a young girl at the video store and takes her to his home while his parents are away.

He's not trying to get lucky however. Instead Benny takes this as an opportunity to use the bolt pistol that he stole after he filmed the pig slaughter to kill the young girl.

This is a long brutal scene that is viewed almost entirely through Benny's video camera. Even though all the violence is off screen it's hard to watch.

This is the strongest sequence in the film. It's in fact the only part of the movie where a character is empathetic.

That's the young girl by the way not Benny. Benny continues his weekend by going to a club with friends, taking in a movie and getting a new buzz cut.

Oh and then he cleans up the dead body in his bedroom. When his parents return he shows them the video of the murder and than a very long and unemotional conversation ensues between the parents deciding what to do with Benny and the corpse.

They decide the best course of action is for his mother to take Benny on a vacation to Egypt while his father Georg stays at home and chops up the body to cover it up.

Sounds like a plan. Everything seems fine when Benny and his mom return. Georg asks Benny why he did it and then things go back to the good old days back before the family included a homicidal teenager.

The film than concludes with Benny at the police station assumedly turning in his parents for the murder.

What a special young boy Benny is. This film tries to comment on dehumanization and the effects of the media. It is unrelenting in addressing these issues, maybe a little too much.

When Benny's parents find out that he just killed a young girl they are not as much concerned with why there son is so screwed up but how they are going to clean up the mess he has caused.

He is taken on vacation and never once reprimanded for the little crime he committed. They never address to him what happened or even take away his camera and television.

Kids get in more trouble for not taking out the garbage. They choose to cover for him and he ultimately betrays them with the same amount of remorse he had when he murdered a young girl.

These characters are flat and unrelateable. That's Haneke's style. Just like in "Funny Games" he is not concerned with connecting with the audience but with insulting the conventions of modern media and he does that well.

Benny, an Austrian teenager likes to sit in his darkened room and watch videos. Not only that but he prefers total saturation, when he's not watching TV, it's always on in the background, along with heavy metal.

Benny has two expressions, absorption, and the nonchalant mask he puts on to manipulate people. It appears his favourite video is one he took himself of a pig being slaughtered during a family holiday.

When the pig gets it with the airgun po-faced Benny rewinds. It was an unnerving film for me to watch simply because there was I in a darkened room watching a TV screen surrounded by bookshelf after bookshelf of videos, watching Benny in exactly the same surroundings.

Furthermore Benny was pretty much the same age as I was back in I even had nostalgia for the packaging at the local MacDonalds, nine chicken McNuggets in a box with woven print!

Haneke takes forensic shots of these fast food items, just like his static shots of the father taking apart the telephone in The Seventh Continent.

Benny it seems is often left alone on the weekends, lord knows what I would have got up to if I'd been left at home with a few bills from mum and dad's wallet!

I knew a boy at school who was in that situation and ended up becoming the school drug dealer. Benny likes getting videos from the local video store a lot, this also was my teenage preoccupation.

The more violent and crazy the better! We're left in no doubt as to his character, at choir practice all the angelic boys sing full-throated and yet are passing notes and pills behind their backs in a relay.

Superbly subversive shooting! Benny has got bored with anything other than video and even has a very creepy setup where he draws blackout blinds on all the living room windows, the image from outside is then relayed through a video camera peeping out, to a television set just in front of the window!

Here we have the heart of voyeurism, one-way engagement. It's clear things are not going to go well, as we are in the world of Michael Haneke, and in a humour-free universe.

Benny lures a young girl home from the video store where he proceeds to video her death at his hands. He uses the airgun from his favourite porcine video.

He seems initially perturbed after the murder, but we also see him stop to have a glass of milk, and also in the evening he arranges to go out partying and to copy his friend's homework.

World cinema lovers will be pleased to see Ulrich Muhe recently from The Lives of Others as the father. At length, Benny has to tell his parents what he has done as the girl's corpse has been in a cupboard in their flat for two days.

It's at this point where we see how purblind the parents are. The living room is decorated in yet more image saturation, Magritte, Warhol, Liechtenstein, Botticelli, all collaged into a morass of vacant imagery and valuelessness.

The father's initial thoughts include the impact of the murder on Benny's CV. Truly this piece of paper represents the sum of one's existence in this warped universe!

The parent's decide to cover the murder up, and Benny and his mother go for a holiday in the middle east.

The part in the middle east is very pretty, we see all sorts of shots of marketplaces, ancient mud-built houses, hieroglyphics, monuments.

It's clear though that this is again yet more vacant image saturation, however beautiful, the hieroglyphics meaningless to Benny and his mother who look on in their culturally imperialistic parade around Egpyt, Tunisia and beyond.

Another reviewer has pointed to the remorseless contemptibility of this exercise, however I think that both Benny and his mother were experiencing remorse ie.

Benny has his head shaved, the mother cries on her hotel bed , in however constipated a manner. Benny almost inexplicably decides on his return home to Austria to shop his parents to the police, having recorded their post-discovery conversation.

Is this Haneke signalling just desserts, indicating that if you breed vipers they will eat you? Is Benny manipulatively shopping his parents in the hope of clemency, or has he genuinely had a pang of conscience and proffered his parents to justice?

A slight pity that Haneke went down the Funny Games dead ends after this, with only Cache as a return to form. This film urges one to self-examine, and is therefore, priceless.

Benny has everything! A wealthy family that gives him a great life, money to spend with his friends at McDonalds, more money so that he can rent the videos he wants at the videostore; everything constitutes for Benny being a good teenager, or a good person.

But he also has a darker side: a strange fascination for death that seems to increase in his soul, to later be exteriorized in his body, after filming a horrific execution of a pig showed right in the opening and repeated one more time.

That image leads to his first real crime, the murder of a young girl randomly picked on the street, who is brutally murdered by him.

Reason: Out of curiosity. In "Benny's Video" director Michael Haneke argues about our hunger for violence, a hunger that seem to be everywhere, it follows us all the time and we can't deny our impression with it that's why violent films are more popular than artistic films.

It's present in the films Benny rents, on the news he watches with his parents, everywhere. Who can blame the boy?

His morbid desire had to be fulfilled, he needed to know if killing someone is a unimpressive experience than the one he has while watching his films or repeatedly watching the pig's death, first in the usual speed, than in slow motion.

Here's a boy who recurred to violence simply because no one was around mother and father were traveling and nothing could stop him at the moment.

And we could say that he could go on killing more people given the fact his parents haven't turned him to the police but he saw that what he did was too much.

Played by an always impressive Arno Frisch way before of making of us his accomplices with his disturbing and violent experiences in "Funny Games" , Benny is quite a figure and his deadly obsessions and the murder makes Macaulay Culkin's pranks in "The Good Son" something funny.

In all of his amazing stoicism, the killing of a girl was acceptable but seeing what his parents did, covering up for him and getting rid of the corpse was way worst and that he couldn't tolerate that explains the ending, in part.

And the parents played by Ulrich Mühe, ironically he would play the victim of Frisch in "Funny Games" and Angela Winkler are even hard to imagine, not in the sense of they saying they love their son when they don't but this protection and their cold reaction on the fact he murdered someone the mother even burst in laughter right after Benny's confession.

Not a single emotion appears right after that, except when they travel to Egypt while the father arranges a way to disappear with the girl's body the mother shows some reaction by crying but even that crying seems so doubtful, we can't know for sure why she's doing that.

Haneke impresses us by showing how Benny committed the crime but without appealing to the Hollywood formula of gore, yet it is a disturbing moment.

He puts a camera filming a part of the house, we can only hear what's happening in the other room, the girl screams, the sound of the gun a captive bolt pistol, same thing used by Anton Chigurh in a more well known film being used.

It's difficult to not be shocked or feel frozen after that. More impressive than this moment only the first and real image of the film, already mentioned, something quite unnecessary on a film that wants to make a criticism over violence but opens this same film to the shock of many viewers.

How many continued to watch after the pig's execution? If you can't deal with it, just fast forward these 40 seconds, and continue to watch the film, the discussions made by "Benny's Video" are many, all of them welcome and relevant.

I have some issues with the film in terms of its structure but I can't understand all this complain about the film being slow. It's slow paced but it's not that bad.

The way Haneke used slowness at some points and in some of the three acts that was unnerving. The first act deals with the controversial and most interesting part of the film, the one in which we keep asking ourselves 'what comes next?

The trip to Egypt was boring, it often breaks the pace of the movie, and when it's not doing this it gets worse when it seems to take us out of the movie, it seems a different film with nowhere to go and nothing to say.

But when we reach the third act, back in Sweden, it comes some good surprises; then, finally leaves us with some doubts about the ending.

Brutal in its reality, shocking in its content but subtle in its presentation, this is an uncomfortable and unsettling film that doesn't exist to inspire more Benny's out there, in case some detractors might think that films like this are responsible for violence in the world.

It's there to open our eyes to a wider, depressive and sad reality that could be happening close to you and you wouldn't know. A teenage boy Arno Frisch who watches violent videos brings a girl back to his parent's apartment whilst they are away and films his murder of her.

Michael Haneke's disturbing film suggests that violent videos may not only desensitize, but influence some to commit violent acts.

Benny is ultimately a distanced boy who can't really seem to connect to anyone on a meaningful level despite his intelligence and middle-upper class upbringing with supportive parents.

The moral dilemma faced by his parents after he shows them the video is powerful and grim as his father Ulrich Muhe logically, but somewhat coldly, weighs up the pros and cons of the dilemma.

The film does lose some momentum as Benny and his mother go away for a week whilst his father disposes of the body on their farm in the country.

It is probably intentional that Haneke leaves the viewer in the dark as to how Muhe is getting along, just as Benny and his mother are.

The unrest and boredom that they feel as they wait for the week to be over is perfectly conveyed and instilled in the viewer.

The final twist where Frisch turns in his parents after having recorded their conversation about what to do and to ultimately dispose of the body again shows Haneke's interest in subverting expectations.

As usual Haneke doesn't offer any easy answers. We never quite know why Frisch committed the murder, it wasn't really premeditated and he himself can't really articulate why he did it, when he is finally asked by Muhe.

For the past thirteen years it has been impossible to get anything other than a crappy VHS copy of Michael Haneke's brilliant and disturbing "Benny's Video".

Finally, it is out on DVD. It sure took 'em long enough! The Austrian Haneke is one of the great idiosyncratic filmmakers of our times.

And his "emotional glaciation" trilogy all of it finally out on DVD - hooray!! That means you! You - reading this!!

In particular, a video of a pig being slaughtered. Benny spends his days with his shades drawn, listening to speed metal and watching violent video images.

He doesn't even look outside, but has a camera set up to play a constant, live "view" of the outside world on one of his TVs.

The plot essentially takes off when Benny invites a young girl and possible love interest back to his parents house while they are away.

The last third of the film lulls a little bit, but other than that this is essential Michael Haneke. Highly recommended.

Anyways it had some great concepts and awesome foreshadowing in it and the ending really was dark and marvelous. But it was all present in such a way that it was horribly boring to watch.

It was tedious through the whole movie, and everything was slow and wretchedly so. This film could have been compressed into a lot shorter of a movie and come off as a way better performance but as it was I just can't say i enjoyed it overall.

I was glad when it was over, it had great promise and I can see why people enjoyed it but personally for myself I just couldn't take it.

I know most fans of this movie will disagree but as an everyday movie viewer like myself, it was just to slow, all the concepts where there though and it was a good movie, but I couldn't take the pace, 4 out of The world though Benny's video camera is a disjointed, skewed and dangerous one.

Played back through his VCR, along with the countless video nasties he seems to be able to rent without his age 14 being questioned from his local video rental store, that distortion is multiplied indefinitely.

At times, this film is repulsive and sickening, as we start with a pig that the family want to slaughter for meat is filmed having a bolt shot through its head.

His parents are involved in the travel business and go away whilst Benny stays at home with all his high-tech gizmos, all that his parents had bought for him, presumably to make him happy.

Getting a girl into this ivory tower of his, he plays her the pig vid and then shows the instrument used on the animal that he had stolen for a souvenir.

In a game of dare, she gets shot with it and this is where it all goes horribly strange and ugly. Most folks - all folks, actually - would phone for an ambulance.

He doesn't, he re-loads it with bolts and does so again and again. We see a TV with this being filmed, with only the periphery showing.

He then films himself streaking her blood on his naked body. I hope that this hasn't spoiled things too much but the main thrust of the film is the aftermath of all this.

Parents come home, Benny gets a skinhead haircut and then replays the vids of the "accident" over and again, just when the parents are going past the open door of his room.

What we make of Haneke's matter of fact portrayal of the parents colluding to and discussing what to do with her body is one of open debate.

Their emotionless disdain for what has happened appals, and so it should. Benny and his mother then go on holiday to the Red Sea, where Benny films everything.

The films pans out to its end matter-of-factly with the family going off to bury the girl's body and Haneke makes a bold and sweeping statement simply by having us watching them through the bank of monitors that show what all the surveillance cameras dotted about the house show.

Though Benny's Video was made exactly 20 years ago, it still is as important and pertinent now as it was then. Uncompromising and powerful, if largely unlikeable.

I never have seen a scene like the senseless death of the young girl, which happens in this movie; Haneke almost shows nothing but it is the most heart-breakening situation I've ever watched in a movie although I'm really not inexperienced in touching as well as violence presenting movies!

Nothing for tender-hearted characters!!! Not as accomplished and tight as some of Hanekes other movies.

Some episodes in the latter part of the movie could have been shortened the vacation , and gives the movie overweight towards the end. A chilling first act, but the climax negates what has been happening all along.

It raises important issues and is worth watching, nontheless. The reality that happens in front of Benny's eyes doesn't mean anything.

For him reality is video. He sees violent movies and television news, all of them about crime, corruption and war.

Some people who have left their comments here said that the trip to Egypt didn't make much sense, that it loses strength.

Obviously they don't see the contrasting effect between the two things. In Egypt, people from the middle and lower classes are really poor.

Als sie sich deutsch elysium ganzer film am Boden windet, und da er ihre Schreie please click for source ertragen kann, tötet er sie mit zwei weiteren Schüssen. Verleiher Pandora Filmverleih. So richtig viel hat er zwar nicht von seinen Eltern Angela WinklerUlrich Müheda diese oft berufsbedingt unterwegs sind und entsprechend wenig Zeit für ihn haben. Wo kann man diesen Film schauen? Neben dem Video der Schweineschlachtung, einigen Aufnahmen während des Ägyptenaufenthalts und dem Beweisvideo im Verhör ist dies vor allem in der Tötungsszene bedeutend. Der einzelgängerische Benny ist stattdessen mit den neuesten elektronischen Geräten ausgestattet worden, streamkino sich als sein einziges wirkliches Interesse an etwas erweisen. Aber bennys video selbst Ähnliche Filme. Filmtyp Spielfilm. Dass der Film noch continue reading diese starke Wirkung hat, ist Haneke wie auch seinem Ensemble zu verdanken. Dass die Familie über Geld verfügt und sich deshalb zu mehr movie angry stream birds fühlt. Karl Schlifelner. Seine Eltern glänzen stattdessen mit ständiger Abwesenheit. Meine Freunde.